Mar 29 2011
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Photo

Ashopton Viaduct 
One last one from my trip to the Peaks, see previous posts for some of my nocturnal activity during the night preceding and the night of The Super Moon (aka Perigee) which was the closest its been to Earth for some years (356,577kms). Below is some info about the Viaduct and surrounding area in this shot…
 
Ashopton was a village in Derbyshire, England, that was lost along with neighbouring Derwent when the Ladybower Reservoir was constructed in the late 1930s and early 1940s.
The village was located near where the Derwent Valley joins the Snake Valley, (route of the current A57 Snake Pass to Glossop). The only reminder of the village is in the name of the Ashopton Viaduct which carries the A57 across the mouth of the Derwent Valley. The main part of the village was located immediately to the south of the viaduct. Unlike the remains of Derwent Village which have become visible when water levels have dropped, Ashopton will never re-emerge from the waters of Ladybower as silt has already covered the remains of its buildings.
A key part of the village was the Methodist Chapel, built in 1840. The final service was held at the chapel on 25 September 1939. The final hymn sung was The Day’s Dying in the West. The chapel was finally demolished, along with the remaining buildings in the village, in 1943.
The Derwent Valley Museum, located on the Derwent Reservoir dam and run privately by Vic Hallam, tells the history of the Derwent valley and of Derwent and Ashopton as well as the tale of RAF Squadron 617 and its training for Operation Chastise during the Second World War.

Ashopton Viaduct 

One last one from my trip to the Peaks, see previous posts for some of my nocturnal activity during the night preceding and the night of The Super Moon (aka Perigee) which was the closest its been to Earth for some years (356,577kms). Below is some info about the Viaduct and surrounding area in this shot…

Ashopton was a village in Derbyshire, England, that was lost along with neighbouring Derwent when the Ladybower Reservoir was constructed in the late 1930s and early 1940s.

The village was located near where the Derwent Valley joins the Snake Valley, (route of the current A57 Snake Pass to Glossop). The only reminder of the village is in the name of the Ashopton Viaduct which carries the A57 across the mouth of the Derwent Valley. The main part of the village was located immediately to the south of the viaduct. Unlike the remains of Derwent Village which have become visible when water levels have dropped, Ashopton will never re-emerge from the waters of Ladybower as silt has already covered the remains of its buildings.

A key part of the village was the Methodist Chapel, built in 1840. The final service was held at the chapel on 25 September 1939. The final hymn sung was The Day’s Dying in the West. The chapel was finally demolished, along with the remaining buildings in the village, in 1943.

The Derwent Valley Museum, located on the Derwent Reservoir dam and run privately by Vic Hallam, tells the history of the Derwent valley and of Derwent and Ashopton as well as the tale of RAF Squadron 617 and its training for Operation Chastise during the Second World War.