Mar 04 2012
1 note

Photo

Black Velvet on Flickr.
McGanns Bar, Doolin - County Clare, Ireland Dark, moody and Irish & that was just the clientele (only joking)!

Black Velvet on Flickr.

McGanns Bar, Doolin - County Clare, Ireland

Dark, moody and Irish & that was just the clientele (only joking)!


Jan 08 2012
11 notes

Photo

How The Other Half Live on Flickr.Souvenir shoppers pass by an Eastern European woman begging on the steps of the Rialto Bridge. I literally only took one shot of this, partly out of respect and also as I have mentioned on a few occasions when I do turn my hand to street photography I don’t like to distract from the scene by overtly shooting. Unlike someone who passed by moments later taking as many shots from as many possible angles which made me feel a little uneasy…

How The Other Half Live on Flickr.

Souvenir shoppers pass by an Eastern European woman begging on the steps of the Rialto Bridge. I literally only took one shot of this, partly out of respect and also as I have mentioned on a few occasions when I do turn my hand to street photography I don’t like to distract from the scene by overtly shooting. Unlike someone who passed by moments later taking as many shots from as many possible angles which made me feel a little uneasy…


Jan 08 2012
6 notes

Photo

Ploughing Through The Sky & The Water on Flickr.2 x 25s shots (composited) / F8 / ISO100 / 24mm 
After several failed mini night photography missions to the famous Venetian bridge, this is the best I came up with, wish I had known the stars were so prominent may have dared to insist to Mrs TdM that we hang around a little longer, but it was rather brisk at night in Venice and I was losing my patience with this location! 
If I go back I would definitely have another pop if conditions were suitable but that will have to be a pipe dream for now. Light trails are caused by a Vapporetto (Waterbus) and several smaller “Speedboat” type water taxis zooming through the shot. A bit about the bridge below…
——————————————————————————————————————
The first dry crossing of the Grand Canal was a pontoon bridge built in 1181 by Nicolò Barattieri. It was called the Ponte della Moneta, presumably because of the mint that stood near its eastern entrance.
The development and importance of the Rialto market on the eastern bank increased traffic on the floating bridge, so it was replaced in 1255 by a wooden bridge. This structure had two inclined ramps meeting at a movable central section, that could be raised to allow the passage of tall ships. The connection with the market eventually led to a change of name for the bridge. During the first half of the 15th century two rows of shops were built along the sides of the bridge. The rents brought an income to the State Treasury, which helped maintain the bridge.
Maintenance was vital for the timber bridge. It was partly burnt in the revolt led by Bajamonte Tiepolo in 1310. In 1444 it collapsed under the weight of a crowd watching a boat parade and it collapsed again in 1524.
The idea of rebuilding the bridge in stone was first proposed in 1503. Several projects were considered over the following decades. In 1551 the authorities requested proposals for the renewal of the Rialto Bridge, among other things. Plans were offered by famous architects such as Jacopo Sansovino, Palladio and Vignola, but all involved a Classical approach with several arches, which was judged inappropriate to the situation. Michelangelo also was considered as designer of the bridge.
The present stone bridge, a single span designed by Antonio da Ponte, was finally completed in 1591. It is similar to the wooden bridge it succeeded. Two inclined ramps lead up to a central portico. On either side of the portico the covered ramps carry rows of shops. The engineering of the bridge was considered so audacious that architect Vincenzo Scamozzi predicted future ruin. The bridge has defied its critics to become one of the architectural icons of Venice. (Wikipedia)

Ploughing Through The Sky & The Water on Flickr.

2 x 25s shots (composited) / F8 / ISO100 / 24mm

After several failed mini night photography missions to the famous Venetian bridge, this is the best I came up with, wish I had known the stars were so prominent may have dared to insist to Mrs TdM that we hang around a little longer, but it was rather brisk at night in Venice and I was losing my patience with this location!

If I go back I would definitely have another pop if conditions were suitable but that will have to be a pipe dream for now. Light trails are caused by a Vapporetto (Waterbus) and several smaller “Speedboat” type water taxis zooming through the shot. A bit about the bridge below…

——————————————————————————————————————

The first dry crossing of the Grand Canal was a pontoon bridge built in 1181 by Nicolò Barattieri. It was called the Ponte della Moneta, presumably because of the mint that stood near its eastern entrance.

The development and importance of the Rialto market on the eastern bank increased traffic on the floating bridge, so it was replaced in 1255 by a wooden bridge. This structure had two inclined ramps meeting at a movable central section, that could be raised to allow the passage of tall ships. The connection with the market eventually led to a change of name for the bridge. During the first half of the 15th century two rows of shops were built along the sides of the bridge. The rents brought an income to the State Treasury, which helped maintain the bridge.

Maintenance was vital for the timber bridge. It was partly burnt in the revolt led by Bajamonte Tiepolo in 1310. In 1444 it collapsed under the weight of a crowd watching a boat parade and it collapsed again in 1524.

The idea of rebuilding the bridge in stone was first proposed in 1503. Several projects were considered over the following decades. In 1551 the authorities requested proposals for the renewal of the Rialto Bridge, among other things. Plans were offered by famous architects such as Jacopo Sansovino, Palladio and Vignola, but all involved a Classical approach with several arches, which was judged inappropriate to the situation. Michelangelo also was considered as designer of the bridge.

The present stone bridge, a single span designed by Antonio da Ponte, was finally completed in 1591. It is similar to the wooden bridge it succeeded. Two inclined ramps lead up to a central portico. On either side of the portico the covered ramps carry rows of shops. The engineering of the bridge was considered so audacious that architect Vincenzo Scamozzi predicted future ruin. The bridge has defied its critics to become one of the architectural icons of Venice. (Wikipedia)


Jan 07 2012
17 notes

Video

Rialto Sunset on Flickr.

180 Images, whipped up into a short but sweet little time lapse, its made with a selection of 4 & 6 second shots. I wish I had made time to do a bit more of this kind of thing while we were there as Venice is full of hustle and bustle in the well worn tourist routes; yet a left, a right, over a bridge and down a short alley way and you’re in a quiet piazza that seems untouched by human existence, save for a few pigeons and maybe a local cafe owner loitering about outside smoking…and too be honest it was too much fun exploring to stand around all day ;-)

Composite of the sunset from serval images shot prior to setting the time lapse going…

Rialto Sunset


Jan 07 2012
49 notes

Photo

Masque on Flickr.Venetian Masks for Carnivalle, usually held in February.

Been a bit lazy updating promise some more soon…

Masque on Flickr.

Venetian Masks for Carnivalle, usually held in February.

Been a bit lazy updating promise some more soon…

Dec 24 2011
5 notes

Photo


Venice, a set on Flickr.
ThinkSideways TakeAquacrussifixthe smoking man

Venice, a set on Flickr.


Nov 21 2011
18 notes

Photo

Spanish Point, County Clare - Ireland, a set on Flickr.Recent trip to the West Coast of the Emerald Isle.
Point BreakersBouy Life Shore is GreatSmoke StackNo Place Like Home (in the middle of nowhere)!

Spanish Point, County Clare - Ireland, a set on Flickr.

Recent trip to the West Coast of the Emerald Isle.

Nov 21 2011
4 notes

Photo

British Museum on Flickr.Balcony at the British Museum 
6 Stitch Vertical Panorama; I literally ran up the stairs when I saw this balcony above the main hallway! Just having a play with some old shots from earlier in the year. Had a bit of a lapse in creativity heavier workload, crap weather and various other bits and pieces getting in the way of photography! 
Anyway I am off to the West Coast of Ireland next week so hopefully that will change, will be nice to get out in the field again!

British Museum on Flickr.

Balcony at the British Museum

6 Stitch Vertical Panorama; I literally ran up the stairs when I saw this balcony above the main hallway! Just having a play with some old shots from earlier in the year. Had a bit of a lapse in creativity heavier workload, crap weather and various other bits and pieces getting in the way of photography!

Anyway I am off to the West Coast of Ireland next week so hopefully that will change, will be nice to get out in the field again!


Oct 02 2011
4 notes

Photo

Jong ill Beats on Flickr.Northern Querter - Manchester
“Come a wriril closer to ma boombox”

Jong ill Beats on Flickr.

Northern Querter - Manchester

“Come a wriril closer to ma boombox”


Sep 24 2011
3 notes

Photo

Tile & Brick 
Victoria Baths - Manchester From a recent visit to the former bath house on National Heritage Day, it was nice to revisit the Manchester landmark and for free too! My last visit was four years ago on a specially arranged photographers only guided tour, whilst that was great to have the run of the place; asides from the bathrooms themselves, some external buildings there wasn’t so much to see. 
However this time around the building has since received it’s National Lottery grant of £3 Million, unfortunately this has had to be mainly spent on the exterior of the building which it has to be said is more than evident. It has been returned to its former grandeur, as T. de Courcy Meade and his assistant Arthur Davies intended when it first opened in 1906. 
 Whilst this was an open day and there a quite a few visitors, which was encouraging to see (generating more funding for further restoration) the major difference to my previous visit was far more access to the front elevations of the building, including being able see all of the beautiful stained glass windows on the ground floor.         

Is Every Body Sitting Comfortably? 


3’s Company 

more to follow…

Tile & Brick 

Victoria Baths - Manchester

From a recent visit to the former bath house on National Heritage Day, it was nice to revisit the Manchester landmark and for free too! My last visit was four years ago on a specially arranged photographers only guided tour, whilst that was great to have the run of the place; asides from the bathrooms themselves, some external buildings there wasn’t so much to see. 

However this time around the building has since received it’s National Lottery grant of £3 Million, unfortunately this has had to be mainly spent on the exterior of the building which it has to be said is more than evident. It has been returned to its former grandeur, as T. de Courcy Meade and his assistant Arthur Davies intended when it first opened in 1906. 

 Whilst this was an open day and there a quite a few visitors, which was encouraging to see (generating more funding for further restoration) the major difference to my previous visit was far more access to the front elevations of the building, including being able see all of the beautiful stained glass windows on the ground floor.         

Is Everybody Sitting Comfortably

Is Every Body Sitting Comfortably?

3's Company

3’s Company 

more to follow…


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